I get asked many questions about the origins and uses of black soap. I love sharing the fascinating information I have gathered both from my experience using it as a child growing up in Nigeria and from my research as I travel to various production sites in Ghana. It's amazing how women have used simple and locally available material to create soaps that are truly effective clearing and brightening the skin. I hope you enjoy this post and feel free to send us your thoughts and questions about African black soap.

What is African Black African Soap?

African black soap is a dark colored cleansing bar. It is soft and porous and dissolves faster than most cold press soaps. Organic black soap produces a very rich lather and gives the skin a clean soft feel. Many users claim that organic black soap buffs away dead skin cells and clears up acne, eczema, blemishes and discolorations. Black soap is 100% natural, organic and vegan in origin and process.

Origin

Organic african black Soap, Ose Dudu or Alata Samina is a true West African Soap and one of Africa’s best-kept beauty secrets. Organic black soap has its origins among the Yoruba in Nigeria, but receives more widespread use and production among Ghanaian West Africans. Legend has it that the organic black soap was introduced to Ghana many years ago by Yoruba traders doing business in Ghana. These traders were women and many were in the business of selling tomatoes and peppers. They were called the Alatas (Pepper Sellers). Samina is an Akan word for soap. The word Alata Samina, coined by Ghanaians, means 'The Pepper Traders Soap'.

Who Uses African Black Soap?

Although African in origin, black soap is suitable for all ethnicities and works especially well lifting dead dry skin to reveal newer & healthier glowing skin. It is gentle enough to use morning and night and does a great job of unclogging pores.

 What are some misconceptions you’ve had about organic african black soap? Share your experiences with us and tag us on social media using #ShareShea 

Purchase P.U.R.E african black soap here